Wednesday, 20 April 2016

Brief Report: Infant Predictors of Toddler Effortful Control: A Multi-method Developmentally Sensitive Approach

Authors
Nora L. Erickson (Washington State University)
M. A. Gartstein (Washington State University)
Theodore P. Beauchaine (The Ohio State University)

Paper Highlights

  • Examined multi-method indicators of temperament across infancy
  • Used multilevel modelling to explore developmental trajectories of temperament
  • Evidence supports an association between change in infant cuddliness and toddler regulatory abilities

Available here
DOI: 10.1002/icd.1971

Author keywords: temperament; effortful control; multilevel modelling

Research Article: Mothers' Reactions to Preschoolers' Proactive and Reactive Aggressive Behaviours

Authors
Sevgi Bayram Özdemir (Center for Developmental Research, Örebro University)

Charissa S. L. Cheah (Psychology, University of Maryland)


Paper Highlights

  • Turkish mothers’ feelings, perceptions, and socialization approaches to childhood aggression vary depending on its nature.
  • Mothers perceive children’s engagement in reactive aggression in the school setting as relatively more acceptable than proactive aggression.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1972

Author keywords: proactive aggression; reactive aggression; parenting; Turkey; parenting; beliefs

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

Research Article: Assessing Biobehavioural Self-Regulation and Coregulation in Early Childhood: The Parent-Child Challenge Task

Authors
Erika Lunkenheimer (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University)
Christine J. Kemp (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University),
Rachel G. Lucas-Thompson (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University),
Pamela M. Cole (Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University)
Erin C. Albrecht (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University)


Paper Highlights

- We examined the effectiveness of the Parent-Child Challenge Task, designed to assess individual and dyadic biobehavioral regulatory processes in early childhood..

- Parents and children showed individual and dyadic changes in affect, behavior, and physiology from baseline to challenge conditions, some of which showed concurrent and predictive validity with children's externalizing problems.

- The Parent-Child Challenge Task is an effective new tool for the assessment of individual and dyadic biobehavioral regulatory processes between parents and preschoolers.


DOI: 10.1002/icd.1969

Author keywords: parent–child interaction; self-regulation; coregulation; externalizing behaviour problems; respiratory sinus arrhythmia; dyadic methods

Research Article: The Detection of Prosocial Lying by Children

Authors
Michelle Eskritt (Mount St. Vincent University, Halifax, Nova Scotia)

Kang Lee (Dr. Erick Jackman Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto)


Paper Highlights

- Adults and children were able to detect the pro-social lies of younger children but not the older children.

- Children were able to discriminate between adults’ truthful and untruthful statements, but misidentified adults’ truthful responses as lies.

- Children with more siblings were better able to detect pro-social lies compared to children with fewer siblings.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1969

Author keywords: prosocial lying; lie production; lie detection; deception

Monday, 11 April 2016

Papers on: Siblings for National Siblings Day 2016


For National Siblings Day, links to just a few of the papers published in Infant and Child Development about siblings. 


Current issue, Vol 25, Issue 2, March/April 2016:-
‘Infinity Means it Goes on Forever’: Siblings' Informal Teaching of Mathematics
Keywords: siblings; teaching; mathematics; informal learning; home context
Howe, N.Adrien, E.Della Porta, S.Peccia, S.Recchia, H.Osana, H. P., and Ross, HDOI: 10.1002/icd.1928



Previous issues:-
Parental Division of Household Labour and Sibling Relationship Quality: Family Relationship Mediators
Keywords: 
sibling relationship; division of household labour; gender; parenting; middle childhood; marital satisfaction
Dawson, APike, A, and Bird, L (2015), Parental Division of Household Labour and Sibling Relationship Quality: Family Relationship Mediators.
DOI: 10.1002/icd.1890

Determinants of Joint Attention in Young Siblings' Play
Keywords: 
joint attention;temperament;theory of mind;siblings;social interaction

Benigno, J. P. and Farrar, M. J.
DOI: 10.1002/icd.743

Sibling jealousy in early childhood: longitudinal links to sibling relationship quality
Keywords: siblings; jealousy; conflict; fathers
Kolak, A. M. and Volling, B. L.
DOI: 10.1002/icd.690

Sibling relationship quality in early adolescence: child and maternal perceptions and daily interactions
Keywords: sibling relationship quality; maternal & child perceptions; daily interactionsHowe, N., Karos, L. K. and Aquan-Assee, J
DOI: 10.1002/icd.694

Older siblings influence younger siblings' motor development

Keywords: motor development; infancy; siblings; crawling; walking
Berger, S. E. and Nuzzo, K. 
DOI: 10.1002/icd.571

Reciprocal and complementary sibling interactions, relationship quality and socio-emotional problem solving

keywords: siblings;reciprocal–complementary;relationship quality;socio-emotional problem solving
Karavasilis Karos, L., Howe, N. and Aquan-Assee, J. 
DOI: 10.1002/icd.492

‘You be the big sister’: Maternal-preschooler internal state discourse, perspective-taking, and sibling caretaking


  • Keywords: siblings; 
  • caretaking; 
  • perspective-taking; 
  • discourse
  • Howe, N. and Rinaldi, C. M.
    DOI: 10.1002/icd.350


Wednesday, 6 April 2016

New Issue: Volume 25, Issue 2, March/April 2016





Link to Volume 25, Issue 2, March/April 2016


Issue Information (pages 117–118)
DOI: 10.1002/icd.1936

Research Articles

Blog: Lying for the Collective




Author: Gail Heyman

Although disapproval of lying is widespread across human societies, people often carve out exceptions. We investigated one such case: when a lie is told to advance the interests of people that one is associated with. Lies that are told in these contexts are sometimes called blue lies because they resemble situations in which police officers, who typically wear blue uniforms in the United States, make false statements to protect fellow officers who are being investigated for misconduct.

We studied moral judgments about blue lies in China, where group loyalty is a strongly emphasized social value. Participants ranging in age from 9 to 17 heard about individuals who lied to conceal transgressions that were committed by members of groups the participant was associated with. The way the group was defined varied in scale: it was described as being comprised of individuals in either the participant's classroom, school, or country. For example, participants in one story were told about a volleyball match between high school teams representing China and the U.S. While watching the match, a Chinese protagonist realizes that one member of her team is actually a star college player rather than a high school student, but she lies when asked about it so that her team will look good and win the game.

We found that older children placed a greater emphasis on loyalty to larger and more abstract groups: 9- and 11-year olds were least critical of blue lies told to benefit a speaker’s class, 13-year olds were least critical of blue lies told to benefit a speaker’s school, and 17-year olds were least critical of blue lies told to benefit a speaker’s country. These findings suggest that young children initially develop a sense of loyalty toward individuals they know personally within small group settings, and that when children are older they begin to extend this sense of loyalty to larger groups. These results are consistent with the possibility that patriotism emerges as an extension of feelings that children first develop when interacting in small, close-knit groups. 


Tuesday, 5 April 2016

Research Article: Behavioural Problems in Children with Headache and Maternal Stress: Is Children's Attachment Security a Protective Factor?

Authors
Lavinia Barone (Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia)
Francesca Lionetti (Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia)
Antonio Dellagiulia, (Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia)
Federica Galli (Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan)
Silvia Molteni (Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia)

Umberto Balottin (Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, and Child Neuropsychiatry Unit, C. Mondino National Neurological Institute)



Paper Highlights

  • Children’s headache is a potentially disabling condition involving enduring pain that negatively influences the quality of family life.
  • Behavioural problems are often present in children with headache, and are potentially associated with higher levels of parental stress in the caring tasks.
  • In families with chronic health problems, like headache, a good relation between the mother and the child, that is attachment security, may help in managing negative emotions, helping in breaking the cycle of children’s behavioural problems and parental stress.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1950

Research Article: Promoting Honesty: The Influence of Stories on Children's Lie-Telling Behaviours and Moral Understanding

Authors
Victoria Talwar (Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology, McGill University)
Sarah Yachison (Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology, McGill University)

Karissa Leduc (Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology, McGill University)


Paper Highlights

  • The current study investigated the influence of moral stories which emphasized positive moral consequences for honesty, negative moral consequences for lying or a neutral story on children’s willingness to lie for another individual
  • While most children initially tried to keep the secret, children in  children in the positive story condition were more likely to tell the truth when asked direct questions compared to those in the negative story and neutral storyconditions
  • In addition, the type of story children were read had a significant impact on their evaluations of true and false statements

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1949

Research Article: Agent Perception in Children with and Without Imaginary Companions

Authors
Yusuke Moriguchi (Department of School Education, Joetsu University of Education and Japan Science and Technology Agency, PRESTO programme)
Ikuko Shinohara (National Institute for Educational Policy Research)

Mikako Ishibashi (Department of Psychology, Ochanomizu University)


Link to article
DOI: 10.1002/icd.1953

Research Article: The Effect of Maltreatment Type on Adolescent Executive Functioning and Inner Speech

Authors
Mimi Kirke-Smith (Language and Communication Sciences Division, City University London)
Lucy A. Henry  (Language and Communication Sciences Division, City University London)

David Messer (Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology, Open University)


Paper Highlights

  • Examines the differential impact of maltreatment type on executive functioning and inner speech.
  • Provides support that different types of maltreatment can lead to different cognitive and behavioural outcomes.
  • The findings can be used to target specific interventions to help maltreated adolescents and improve their educational outcomes.



Link to article
DOI: 10.1002/icd.1951

Research Article: Timing of Early Maternal Mental Health and Child Cortisol Regulation

Authors
Mervi Vänskä (Psychology/School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere)
Raija-Leena Punamäki (Psychology/School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere)
Jallu K. Lindblom (Psychology/School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere)
Asko Tolvanen (Department of Psychology, University of Jyvaskyla)
Marjo Flykt (Psychology/School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere)
Leila Unkila-Kallio (Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Helsinki)
Maija Tulppala (Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Helsinki)

Aila Tiitinen (Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Helsinki)


Link to article
DOI: 10.1002/icd.1948

Research Article: Emotion Regulation in At-Risk Preschoolers: Longitudinal Associations and Influences of Maternal Histories of Risk

Authors
Elana G. August (Concordia University, Psychology, Montreal)
Dale M. Stack (Concordia University, Psychology, Montreal)
Alexa Martin-Storey (Université de Sherbrooke, Psychoéducation)
Lisa A. Serbin (Concordia University, Psychology, Montreal)
Jane Ledingham (University of Ottawa, Psychology)

Alex E. Schwartzman (Concordia University, Psychology, Montreal)


Paper Highlights

  • There is some continuity in emotion regulation behaviours from infancy to preschool.
  • Maternal childhood history of risk predicts some aspects of preschool emotion regulation.
  • Maternal non-constructive verbalizations are related to preschoolers' emotion regulation behaviours.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1954

Brief Report: Maternal Emotion Socialization: The Contribution of Inhibited Behaviour and Mothers' Dissatisfaction with the Parent–Child Relationship

Authors
Amy E. Root (Department of Learning Sciences & Human Development, West Virginia University)

Katie E. Rasmussen (Department of Learning Sciences & Human Development, West Virginia University)


Paper Highlights

  • Parenting dissatisfaction is negatively associated with mothers' supportive reactions to happiness.
  • Mothers who reported the highest levels of dissatisfaction in their relationship with their children and had children who exhibited low levels of inhibition reported the lowest levels of supportive responses to their children's fear.
  • Mothers reported more non-supportive reactions to boys' display of fear, anger, and happiness than girls' display of the same emotions.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1955

Research Article: Discrimination of Lexical Tones in the First Year of Life

Authors
Ao Chen (Utrecht Institute of Linguistics)

René Kager (Utrecht Institute of Linguistics)


Paper Highlights

  • 4-month-old infants failed to discriminate non-native lexical tones.
  • 6- and 12-month-old infants discriminate non-native lexical tones, presented with either single or multiple tokens.
  • The improvement in perception may be the result of general cognitive development.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1944


Research Article: Social Competence at the Playground: Preschoolers During Recess

Authors
Guida Veiga (Departamento de Desporto e Saúde, Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de Évora and Laboratory of Motor Behavior, Faculdade de Motricidade Humana, Universidade de Lisboa)
Wendy de Leng (Developmental Psychology, Leiden University)
Ricardo Cachucho (Leiden Institute for Advanced Computer Science, Leiden University)
Lizet Ketelaar  (Developmental Psychology, Leiden University, and Dutch Foundation for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Child)
Joost N. Kok (Leiden Institute for Advanced Computer Science, Leiden University)
Arno Knobbe (Leiden Institute for Advanced Computer Science, Leiden University)
Carlos Neto (Laboratory of Motor Behavior, CIPER, Faculdade de Motricidade Humana, Universidade de Lisboa)

Carolien Rieffe (Developmental Psychology, Leiden University, and Dutch Foundation for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Child)


Paper Highlights

  • Children’s constantly changing proximities to each other at the playground were collected using new sensor technology.
  • Running, jumping, climbing (i.e. exercise play) during recess at the playground were related to higher preschoolers' social competence.
  • Also longer durations of the interactions, and smaller social groups were related to higher social competence in preschoolers.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1957


See also:

Research Article: Young Deceivers: Executive Functioning and Antisocial Lie-telling in Preschool Aged Children

Authors
Shanna Williams (McGill University)
Karissa Leduc (McGill University)
Angela Crossman (John Jay College, New York)

Victoria Talwar (McGill University)


Paper Highlights

  • Children as young as 2 1/2-years old tell antisocial lies.
  • The executive functioning skills of inhibitory control and planning support the emergence of antisocial lie-telling in the preschool age range.
  • Preschool lie-tellers identify truths and lies more accurately than their honesty counterparts.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1956

Research Article: Comparing Fathers' Physical and Toy Play and Links to Child Behaviour: An Exploratory Study

Authors
Jennifer St George (University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales)
Richard Fletcher (Family Action Centre, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales)

Kerrin Palazzi (University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales)

Paper Highlights

  • Fathers play with children is important to their relationship and the child’s development
  • Fathers’ rough-and-tumble play is associated with children’s emotional and behavioural functioning and self-regulation.
  • Fathers’ toy-play is associated with self-regulation.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1958

Brief Report: Preliminary Evaluation of a Social Skills Training and Facilitated Play Early Intervention Programme for Extremely Shy Young Children in China

Authors
Yan Li (Department of Early Child Education, Shanghai Normal University)
Robert J. Coplan (Department of Psychology, Carleton University)
Yuemin Wang (Fushan Foreign Language Primary School)
Jingtong Yin (Department of Early Child Education, Shanghai Normal University)
Jingjing Zhu (Department of Early Child Education, Shanghai Normal University)
Zhuqing Gao (Department of Early Child Education, Shanghai Normal University)

Linhui Li (Department of Early Child Education, Shanghai Normal University, and Experimental Kindergarten of Shanghai Normal University)


Link to article
DOI: 10.1002/icd.1959

Research Article: Pregnancy Plans of First-time Mothers and Their Children's Outcomes: An Examination of Mechanisms

Authors
Amy M. Claridge (Departmentof Family and Consumer Sciences, College of Education and Professional Studies, Central Washington University)

Paper Highlights

  • Unplanned pregnancy of first-time mothers was associated with lower social-emotional competence among three year old children.
  • Mothers' parenting stress at 24 months was a mechanism through which unplanned pregnancy was associated with children's social-emotional competence.
  • Intervention should seek to reduce parenting stress among families experiencing unplanned pregnancy as they may be at-risk for child behavioral problems.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1962

Research Article: Young Children's Reports of When Events Occurred: Do Event Type and Assessment Method Matter?

Authors
Connie M. Tang (Stockton University)
Sarah Dickey (Stockton University)
Dana Samuelsen (Stockton University)


Paper Highlights

  • Young children report when learning events occurred as accurately as they report on when physical events occurred
  • Children are more accurate when responding to temporal distance than temporal location questions
  • The way we ask young children about when they experienced various events determines their accuracy

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1963



Brief Report: Assessing Social Cognition: A New Instrumental Paradigm Based on Contingent Feedback

Authors
Evelin Bertin (School of Teacher Education, University of Applied Sciences and Arts)
Charlene Wong (Department of Psychology, Hunter College, CUNY)

Tricia Striano (The Institute for Education on Health and Research, Milton, and Department of Psychology, Hunter College, CUNY)


Paper Highlights

  • We investigated infants' sensitivity to social cues (particularly triadic gaze) in triadic engagement.
  • Infants were asked to make an interesting event occur (turn on a light) when an adult interaction partner looked at the location of the event.
  • Nine months old infants did so regardless of eye contact with the adult, 12-month-olds only when triadic gaze between infant, object and adult was not perturbed.


DOI: 10.1002/icd.1964

Research Article: Children's Moods, Fears and Worries Questionnaire: Validity with Young Children at Risk for Internalizing Problems

Authors
Megan Antonucci (School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University)
Jordana K. Bayer (Murdoch Children's Research Institute, and School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University)

Paper Highlights

  •  Children's Moods Fears and Worries Questionnaire (CMFWQ) was developed to detect internalising (i.e., anxious/depressive) difficulties in young children in the community.
  • The present study aimed to explore reliability and validity for this parent-report questionnaire with temperamentally inhibited young children, who are discussed in developmental psychology literature as being at risk for developing anxiety and related emotional difficulties.
  • With a large population sample of inhibited children transitioning from preschool to school age, the CMFWQ showed internal consistency reliability, along with convergent, discriminant and criterion validity.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1966


Research Article: Parents' Estimations of Preschoolers' Number Skills Relate to at-Home Number-Related Activity Engagement

Authors
      Erica L. Zippert (University of Maryland)
      Geetha B. Ramani (University of Maryland)
Paper Highlights
  • This study examines the accuracy of parents’ beliefs about their preschoolers’ number skills, and relations to at-home number-related activity engagement.
  • Parents’ estimates of children’s number skills were positively biased, and more overestimation and less underestimation correlated with more frequent home number activities.
  • Results suggest guiding parents to understand their own children’s numerical knowledge could promote more frequent home number activity engagement.





DOI: 10.1002/icd.1968

Research Article: Maternal Emotion Socialization and the Development of Inhibitory Control in an Emotional Condition

Authors
Sarah Kahle (University of California)
Jessica S. Grady (University of the Pacific)
Jonas G. Miller (University of California
Monica Lopez (University of California)
Paul D. Hastings (University of California)


Paper Highlights

  • Mothers' emotion language and scaffolding behaviors were assessed during two tasks with their 3.5-year-old children.
  • Different maternal behaviors predicted changes in children's inhibitory control over 6 months depending on whether the task contained emotion content.
  • Improvements on an inhibitory control task with emotion content were predicted by maternal emotion language, while improvements on a non-emotional task were predicted by maternal scaffolding.


DOI: 10.1002/icd.1970

Research Article: Marital Status, Home Environments, and Family Strain: Complex Effects on Preschool Children's School Readiness Skills


Authors
Seung Hee Claire Son (University of Utah, Educational Psychology)
Mieko Fuse Peterson (University of Utah, Family and Consumer Studies)

Paper Highlights

  • Preschool children from single-mother families showed lower pre-academic skill
  • Lower quality home learning environments seem to be the reason of lower pre-academic skills of children from single-mother families; higher levels of parenting stress of single mothers tend to explain lower quality home learning environments.
  • Early intervention programs targeting home learning environments may be fruitful for children from single-mother families; additionally, effective programs could be multi-prong, providing social resources for these families to relieve parenting stresses.


DOI: 10.1002/icd.1967

Research Article: Assessing Biobehavioural Self-Regulation and Coregulation in Early Childhood: The Parent-Child Challenge Task


Authors
  1. Erika Lunkenheimer
  2.  (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University),
  3. Christine J. Kemp (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University),
  4. Rachel G. Lucas-Thompson (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University),
  5. Pamela M. Cole (Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University),
  6. Erin C. Albrecht 
  7. (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University).

Paper Highlights
  • We examined the effectiveness of the Parent-Child Challenge Task, designed to assess individual and dyadic biobehavioral regulatory processes in early childhood.
  • Parents and children showed individual and dyadic changes in affect, behavior, and physiology from baseline to challenge conditions, some of which showed concurrent and predictive validity with children's externalizing problems.
  • The Parent-Child Challenge Task is an effective new tool for the assessment of individual and dyadic biobehavioral regulatory processes between parents and preschoolers.



DOI: 10.1002/icd.1965

Research Article: Maternal Responsive–didactic Caregiving in Play Interactions with 10-month-olds and Cognitive Development at 18 months

Authors
Roni Mermelshtine (Institute for the Study of Children, Families and Social Issues, Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck)

Jacqueline Barnes (Institute for the Study of Children, Families and Social Issues, Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, and Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust)


Paper Highlights

  • Maternal older age, higher levels of education, a smaller family size and less home adversity were all associated with mothers being more responsive in interactions with their 10-month-olds.
  • At 10 months, infants showing higher levels of mature object play were likely to experience more responsive and didactic input from their mothers.
  • Maternal responsive and didactic behaviours in infancy were associated with subsequent cognitive development. An association that remained even after considering the effects of socio-demographic factors. Both contingent response and didactic input appear to matter in interactions as early as the first year.

DOI: 10.1002/icd.1961